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Monthly Archives: May 2016

Business Etiquette

What’s the contrast between the rising star whose profession is grabbing rate and his partner who can’t get the motor to turn over? Frequently, the star has aced the subtleties of business manners – the inconspicuous yet basic practices that can represent the moment of truth an imperative meeting, impact an initial introduction or awe a potential customer.

As per Hilka Klinkenberg, executive of Etiquette International, a business manners firm, the fundamentals of expert behavior are truly very straightforward. Initially, comprehend the distinction between business decorum and social behavior. Business decorum is genderless. For instance, the conventional gallant behavior of holding the entryway open for a lady is redundant in the working environment and can even have the unintended impact of culpable her. In the workplace, men and ladies are associates.

Second, your guiding principle should always be to treat people with consideration and respect. Although this may seem obvious, Klinkenberg cites this basic decency as a frequent casualty in today’s workplace.

Here are a few of the specific dos and don’ts of business etiquette you are likely to encounter during your workday.

Introductions

The proper way to make an introduction is to introduce a lower-ranking person to a higher-ranking person. For example, if your CEO is Mrs. Jones and you are introducing administrative assistant Jane Smith to her, the correct introduction would be “Mrs. Jones, I’d like you to meet Jane Smith.” If you forget a person’s name while making an introduction, don’t panic. Proceed with the introduction with a statement such as, “I’m sorry, your name has just slipped my mind.” Omitting an introduction is a bigger faux pas than salvaging a botched introduction.

Handshakes

The physical connection you make when shaking hands with someone can leave a powerful impression. When someone’shandshake is unpleasant in any way, we often associate negative character traits with that person. A firm handshake made with direct eye contact sets the stage for a positive encounter.

Women take note: To avoid any confusion during an introduction, always extend your hand when greeting someone. Remember, men and women are equals in the workplace.

Electronic Etiquette

Email, faxes, conference calls and cellphones can create a veritable landmine of professional etiquette. Just because you have the capability to reach someone 24/7, it doesn’t mean you should.

Email is so prevalent in many of today’s companies that the transmission of jokes, spam and personal notes often constitute more of the messages employees receive than actual work-related material. Remember that your email messages are an example of your professional correspondence. Professional correspondence does not include smiley faces or similar emoticons.

Faxes should always include your contact information, date and number of pages included. They should not be sent unsolicited — they waste the other person’s paper and tie up the lines.

Conference-call etiquette entails introducing all the participants at the beginning of the call so everyone knows who is in attendance. Since you’re not able to see other participants’ body language and nonverbal clues, you will have to compensate for this disadvantage by communicating very clearly. Be aware of unintentionally interrupting someone or failing to address or include attendees because you can’t see them. And finally, don’t put anyone on speakerphone until you have asked permission to do so.

Cellphones can be a lifesaver for many professionals. Unfortunately, if you are using a cell, you are most likely outside your office and may be preoccupied with driving, catching a flight or some other activity. Be sensitive to the fact that your listener may not be interested in a play-by-play of traffic or the other events you are experiencing during your call.

Even if you have impeccable social graces, you will inevitably have a professional blunder at some point. When this happens, Klinkenberg offers this advice: Apologize sincerely without gushing or being too effusive. State your apology like you mean it, and then move on. Making too big an issue of your mistake only magnifies the damage and makes the recipient more uncomfortable.

Technique of Marketing Research

Organizations do Market Research to accumulate and examine information to comprehend and clarify what individuals think about items or adverts, to get some answers concerning consumer loyalty and to anticipate how clients may react to another item available.

Statistical surveying can be ordered under two subheadings – Quantitative Research and Qualitative Research. The inquiries asked with Quantitative Research are organized while Qualitative Research inquiries are considerably more open and can frequently uncover utilization propensities which the scientists hadn’t already considered. You complete Quantitative Research when you have to know what number of individuals have certain propensities and the Qualitative Research when you have to know why and how individuals do what they do.

Companies involved in Marketing Research include the Research Buyer and the Research Agency. The research agency carries out the market research in ways previously discussed with their clients – the research buyer. Sometimes companies only need their own data analysed, or are simply looking for advice on how to carry out their own research. Points that are discussed between the two parties can include:

  • The time duration of the research
  • The budget available
  • Who the target groups are
  • Predictions of results
  • How the results will be helpful
  • Street Surveys – stopping people in the street
  • Phone or postal – people fill in questionnaires and send them back
  • Internet surveys – a relatively new technique which functions in a similar way to other surveys except that a large number of people are interviewed at the same time
  • Am I asking the right groups of people?
  • How many people should I speak to in order to get representative answers to my questions?
  • Are my questions easy to understand?
  • How am I going to analyse the data?
  • Focus groups – discussion between a small number of people about a product, or advert etc. to find out their views or habits
  • Personal interviews – in-depth discussions on a one-to-one basis
  • CAPI – computer assisted personal interviewing where questions are ‘asked’ by the computer and the answers are typed by the interviewee directly into the database for analysis
  • Observation – this can be used as a complement to asking questions to see how people do what they do
  • Are my questions open enough to get personalised answers?
  • Have I restricted my target group?
  • Do I only need to find out ‘why’ people do what they do or should I also do some quantitative research?

Know More about Coaching

Coaching is a valuable apparatus in today’s difficult universe of business and trade. Organizations are cutting back, consolidating and rebuilding and there is significantly more employment move than some time recently. Infrequently directors are no more prepared to do their work in light of the fact that their employments have changed to such an extent. They were initially prepared to do one employment yet that preparation can’t be connected to the occupation they are doing today. Guiding is likewise a standout amongst the most capable apparatuses that a pioneer has so as to enhance the execution of his group.

Coaching is a partnership between an individual or a team and a coach. For the purpose of this article we will refer to an individual but the concepts are exactly the same for a team. First of all the individual identifies his objectives. Then, through the process of being coached, he focuses on the skills he needs to develop to achieve those objectives. In professional coaching the individual begins by leading the conversation and the coach listens and observes. Gradually, as the coach begins to understand the individual’s goals, he will make observations and ask appropriate questions. His task is to guide the individual towards making more effective decisions and eventually achieving his objectives. Coaching looks at where the individual is now and where he wants to get to.

Between the initial interview and an individual achieving the goals he identified, there is a process in which the two parties meet for regular coaching sessions. The length of time each session lasts will be established at the start of the partnership. Between sessions an individual might be expected to complete specific tasks. A coach might also provide literature for the individual to study in preparation for the following session. Most coaches employ an “appreciative approach” whereby the individual identifies what is right, what is working, what is wanted and what is needed to get there. An appreciative approach focuses more on the positive rather than problems.

An individual who enters into a coaching partnership will usually adopt new perspectives and be able to better appreciate opportunities for self-development. Confidence will usually grow and the individual will think more clearly and be more confident in his roles. In terms of business, coaching often leads to an increase in productivity and more personal satisfaction. All of this leads to a growth in self-esteem.

In a coaching partnership the coach first needs to listen carefully in order to fully understand the individual’s situation. He needs to support and encourage forward-planning and decision-making. A coach also needs to help an individual recognise his own potential and the opportunities that are on offer. A good coach will guide an individual to fresh perspectives. Finally, the coach must respect the confidentiality of his partner.

Coaching can bring out the best in workers, highlighting what they can achieve if they are given the right support. Both individuals and teams can enjoy an increased level of motivation after receiving the right coaching. When individuals are keen to make progress in their jobs, they usually enjoy being coached and find the experience extremely useful.